Robert Pohl

Robert Pohl worked for many years as a computer programmer but recovered from that and became a full time stay-at-home dad. With his son now in school, he has expanded his horizons and become a self-taught historian. He has written books about his house as well as Emancipation in the District of Columbia. You can reach Robert at Robert[at]thehillishome.com

Robert Pohl
27 Mar 2017

History:

Lost Capitol Hill: Daniel W. Jarboe, Murderer, Pt. 3

Part three of the Jarboe saga has a great twist. Good morning, Capitol Hill!


20 Mar 2017

History:

Lost Capitol Hill: Daniel W. Jarboe, Murderer, pt 2.

Last week we learned about the death of John R. Nally at the hands of Daniel W. Jarboe. Both men worked at the Washington Navy Yard; Jarboe was incensed at Nally for refusing to marry Jarboe’s sister. Jarboe was duly incarcerated and put on trial. Two days after the Daily American Organ had outed Jarboe as a […]


13 Mar 2017

History:

Lost Capitol Hill: Daniel W. Jarboe, Murderer

Murder, sadly, has been part of our neighborhood from the earliest days. A particularly rough patch in this regard occurred during the 1850s. One particular murder had long-lasting repercussions, at least from a legal point of view. The whole affair began quite innocuously. It involved two young men, both employed at the Washington Navy Yard. […]


06 Mar 2017

History:

Lost Capitol Hill: George W. Taylor’s Diving Bell

As long as people have gone to sea, boats have sunk. There have also been attempts to raise the boats – or at least their cargo. While today, submersibles, SCUBA outfits, and diving suits make this possible, the methods used in past centuries were not quite as… um, reliable. An early technology, described by Aristotle […]


27 Feb 2017

History:

Lost Capitol Hill: Navy Yard Odd Fellows

While the Masons get all the press, they were hardly the only fraternal organization that flourished during the 19th and early 20th centuries. One of the others – and one of the largest – was named the International Order of Odd Fellows. Like the Masons, they were early residents of Washington D.C. in general, and the Navy […]


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